Bringing it Home for Mondelēz Executives

 

After a four-month international investigation that resulted in the release of the Interfaith Worker Justice report Breaking Faith: Outsourcing and the Damage Done to our Communities alongside Congressman John Lewis in December, Mondelēz executives will soon receive at home a package including the Breaking Faith report and letters from faith leaders and members of Congress urging the mega-corporation to stop outsourcing American jobs to Mexico to avoid paying a living wage. 

The letter signed by 35 faith and labor leaders who comprise the Interfaith Worker Justice board of directors urges Mondelēz to “recognize the moral urgency in respecting your workers on both sides of the border by paying a living wage and ensuring stability of employment as an alternative, values-driven strategy that will at once bolster your bottom line, retain the loyalty of your consumers, and ensure a healthy return for Mondelēz investors while redefining your brand as one committed to worker justice and corporate stewardship.”

After attending the report release in December, Congressman John Lewis and four other members of Congress composed a letter to United States Trade Representative Robert E. Lighthizer using Mondelēz’s outsourcing to illustrate the need to ensure that trade agreements like NAFTA include “strong, enforceable labor standards that raise wages in Mexico and reduce incentives for offshoring; encourage domestic investment; and support well-paying American jobs.”

“Companies like Mondelēz must understand that treating its workers with dignity and respect while paying a living wage is both the right thing to do and a savvy business strategy,” said Doug Mork, president of the Interfaith Worker Justice board of directors. “Time and again, we see companies that commit to corporate responsibility and worker justice thrive in terms of positive brand association and increased consumer loyalty. We will continue to work to convince Mondelēz that a commitment to good, family-sustaining jobs on both sides of the border is good for workers and good for business.”