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Faith Community Supports Super-Sized Justice for Fast-Food Workers

Faith Community Supports Super-Sized Justice for Fast-Food Workers

0 Comment(s) | Posted | by Adam DeRose |

Tomorrow, fast food workers are set to walk off their jobs in more than 100 cities in the U.S. and in more than two-dozen cities globally. This is the biggest day of action fast food workers have planned to date--amplifying the call for fair wages and working conditions and the right to organize!

People of faith are joining the chorus. As advocates who believe firmly in the dignity of work, faith leaders and interfaith groups are getting ready to join workers at rallies, supporting their demand for a $15 per hour wage, an end to rampant wage theft in the industry and the right to form a union to speak out against injustice.

Honest pay for honest work

 
In today’s economy, half the workers in America earn wages at or near the poverty level, Huffington Post Business reported in 2012. The same year, McDonald's Corporation saw $5.5 billion in profits, and it isn’t alone in such extraordinary profit margins since the great recession. Low wages, wage theft and poor access to benefits are great for corporate execs and a few top earners, but at the expense of the millions of workers and their families.

The median hourly wage for fast-food workers nationwide: $8.94 per hour. No one who works full time should have to live in poverty or pray they'll have enough to cover the rent, bills and groceries. It's simply immoral and unjust that many fast food workers are forced to rely on charity and government assistance programs just to get by. People of faith are standing by their side echoing workers' prophetic call for a fair economy.

Fast-food employees began organizing and calling one-day strikes in 2012 to bring attention to the injustice, and (much like McDonald’s soaring profits) they have only grown in size and impact. Tomorrow, we’ll join tens of thousands of workers on the street demanding a just, living wage.

Worker advocates, people of faith and Interfaith Worker Justice supporters can support local actions in their community or support the strikes online by telling McDonald's that low pay and wage theft are simply immoral!

Follow @IWJnational on Twitter or follow all the action using the #FastFoodGlobal hashtag.

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