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Free Trade Strikes Again As 1,300 More Manufacturing Jobs Are Shipped Out

Free Trade Strikes Again As 1,300 More Manufacturing Jobs Are Shipped Out

0 Comment(s) | Posted | by Ian Pajer-Rogers |

by Matt Murray

The failures of so-called free trade agreements continue to plague American workers.

Last week, Carrier announced that they would be moving 1,400 jobs over the next two years to a new plant in Mexico.  This move will allow Carrier, and their parent company United Technologies, to continue to rake in billions in profits and reduce their labor costs at the same time. The average HVAC worker at Carrier in Mexico will make around $6.00 an hour.

On Monday, Philly.com reported that Cardone, an auto parts manufacturer, will be moving 1,300 jobs to their plant in Mexico.

“Cardone, the Philadelphia auto-parts rebuilder which calls itself the city’s largest remaining manufacturing company, will shift 1,336 workers from its brake caliper plants at 5501 Whitaker Ave. and 5670 Rising Sun Ave. to a plant in Matamoros, Mexico, just south of Cardone’s warehouses in Brownsville, Texas over the next two years.”

Back in 2011, the Cardone CEO Michael Cardone III said he was committed to Philly when rumors surfaced that the company would be shifting jobs to their Texas and Mexico plants.

“We’re committed to Philadelphia. We’re committed to staying here, and we’re committed to job retention.”

Kevin Feeley, a spokesman for the company, told Philly.com Monday, that the “company was moving the brake work to Mexico because the “entry level” manufacturing work is “particularly sensitive” to cheap foreign competition.”

Again we see exactly how these so-called free trade agreements are destroying American jobs.  Chinese manufacturers are bringing in products cheaper, because they pay workers slave wages and US manufacturers are moving moving overseas to preserve their profit margins.

Read more from NH Labor News

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