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Immigration Reform: A Face to the Numbers

Immigration Reform: A Face to the Numbers

0 Comment(s) | Posted | by Cathy Junia |

We’ve all heard the numbers on immigration: 11 million undocumented immigrants, 16.6 million people in mixed-status families, 1,100 daily deportations that tear families apart, close to 500 border deaths.

It’s easy to get lost and feel overwhelmed by the numbers. So, for the next two minutes, I urge you to listen to Lisa’s story. Lisa was one of the many young speakers at yesterday’s May Day Immigration Reform rally in Chicago. Everyday she lives in constant fear of losing her father to deportation. Lisa is only nine.

 

At many May Day rallies across the country, children like Lisa shared similar stories. No child should have to go through such a heartbreaking experience.

Next week, the proposed immigration reform bill will head to the Senate Judiciary Committee for mark-up and amendments. We all know that the bill is not perfect, but it is an important step forward and a real source of hope for families likes Lisa’s. But it is up to us to push for legislation that reflects our values of compassion and justice.

Ask your Senator to support humane immigration reform that provides an accessible and inclusive path to citizenship, stops deportations and protects the rights of all workers.

We have a real opportunity (and responsibility) to overhaul our broken immigration system and give the millions of Lisa’s out there a chance to enjoy a childhood with their families.

“An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law. Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust.” – St. Thomas Aquinas

The time to reform our unjust immigration system is now. Click here for resources on how to get your family, community and congregation involved in the campaign for comprehensive immigration reform. Our country is not only ready for reform, we need it!

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