Interfaith Worker Justice

This is what religion looks like.

Search
The day after Pentecost

The day after Pentecost

0 Comment(s) | Posted | by Sara Nowlin |

At Pentecost, a group of multilingual, multicultural people was transformed by the powerful coming of the Holy Spirit. The early followers of Jesus began to speak about God’s great works to people from “every nation under heaven” in their native tongue. Christians believe that the Holy Spirit is given to all who put their faith in Christ and become His disciples. The Holy Spirit guides us in our endeavors and leads us to be more like Jesus.

Holy SpiritMore than 2,000 years after Pentecost, those of us who are Christians must ask ourselves: are we open to the power and presence of the Holy Spirit to guide us and change us? Are we open to the Spirit’s call to be active participants in bringing about the Kingdom of God on Earth? Are we willing to contribute to the often difficult and time-consuming work of social change within a diverse body of believers? We must be listening for the Spirit’s prodding as it pushes us towards acts of peace, justice and love.

Today, we feel the rush of that holy wind, and it pushes us to call for justice for workers. We pray and work with our immigrant brothers and sisters for a just path to citizenship and fair treatment in their workplaces. We stand with minimum wage earners and call upon our local, state and federal governments to raise and index the minimum wage  so all workers can earn a living wage. We’re motivated by God’s love and our belief in human dignity to call for and end to wage theft and the many ways employers abuse and exploit workers.

We “hope for what we do not yet have, and we wait for it patiently” (Romans 8:25). We invite you to join us on that journey and strengthening the rights of workers!

Click here to join our team of faithful worker advocates and receive alerts about important worker issues and campaigns!

Comments

We welcome your comments on the IWJ blog and encourage open discussion about important issues around worker justice and the unemployed. Disagreements are fine, but mutual respect is a must. Profanity, slander or abusive language will not be permitted. IWJ reserves the right to delete comments that violate this spirit of respect.

  1. There are no comments yet.

Leave a Comment