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USA Today: Fast-food workers plan new strike, aim to sway election

USA Today: Fast-food workers plan new strike, aim to sway election

0 Comment(s) | Posted | by Ian Pajer-Rogers |

Milwaukee Teachers' Education Association/Flickr

From USA Today:

Fast-food workers, already a potent political force, are planning their largest nationwide strike yet next week and this time will leverage their crusade for a $15-an-hour wage in a bid to sway the 2016 presidential election.

The group representing the workers, Fight for $15, plans on Tuesday to stage protests at restaurants in 270 cities, the most since it began organizing the demonstrations three years ago.

Striking fast-food and other low-wage workers will then gather at local city halls, kicking off a campaign to prod their colleagues to vote next November for local, state and national candidates who support the $15 pay floor. Labor and other groups will simultaneously rally in about 200 other cities, and the daylong blitz will culminate with a protest by several thousand workers at the Republican presidential debate in Milwaukee.

"We're putting politicians on notice that we're going to hold them accountable," says Kendall Fells, the organizing director of Fight for $15, a group funded by the Service Employees International Union.

All of the top Democratic presidential candidates, including Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, have said they back a $12-$15 minimum wage and have made the growing divide between rich and poor a centerpiece of their campaigns. Most of the Republican contenders oppose raising the federal minimum of $7.25 an hour, saying it will hurt job growth.

But Kendall said, "This is not about a candidate, and it's not about a party," adding workers will vote for candidates of any party that support the cause.

From USA Today

 

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